Get Your Book Published: Agents

First, you need to read this post from Mary DeMuth at Write Uncaged–How do you know if you’re ready for an agent?

Now, if you’re ready . . .

Here are five steps to finding your agent:

Step 1: Find lots of agents. Check out the following links for over 100 names of agents.

Step 2: Narrow down your list. Check out their websites, follow them on Twitter and/or Facebook, and read their blogs. Make a list of five to ten agents who represent authors in your genre, have a working relationship with publishing houses you are interested in, and those who you maglie calcio poco prezzo think could be as excited about your book as you are. Take the time necessary to do this step well. Research, research, research.

Step 3: Try to get a referral. Do you have any common friends who could give you a referral? Don’t be pushy, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

Step 4: Write a query letter. Actually, write a few query letters. You can Google “query letter” and get lots of help. I found this post from Nathan Bransford to be one of the best. Make sure you read each agent’s requirements for query and follow them closely! Try to make the process of picking you as easy as possible.

Step 5: Wait. This may be the http://www.magliettedacalcioit.com hardest part. The publishing process is a long journey. After you’ve sent your query letters and/or emails, you wait. While you’re waiting, keep writing, editing, getting feedback, and building your platform. Keep getting better.

Finding an agent can be intimidating, but following these five steps will help!

What agents do you follow on Twitter, Facebook, or by reading their blogs?

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Get Your Book Published: Writers’ Conferences

If you want to get your book published, it may require a team effort. You need an agent and a publisher. How do you find an agent and/or publisher? One ways is at writers’ conferences. A couple years ago I attended the She Speaks Conference near Charlotte, North Carolina. I learned so much about writing, building a platform, and the publishing process at that conference. Plus, I made friends who have the same aspirations for writing I have, and we still support and encourage each other.

 Picture from a bloggers breakfast we had–Standing: Lisa BoydMary SnyderTeri Lynne Underwood, Me, Emily Freeman. Sitting: Laura Lee ShawCindy BultemaVictoria Jenkins, Julie Sanders

According to The Christian Writer’s Market Guide 2012, there are over 100 Christian writers’ conferences in the United States. When I asked on Twitter and Facebook, the following four conferences were the most highly recommended:
You can visit each conferences’ website for information about the dates, cost, location, speakers, workshops, and the agents and publishers who will attend the conference.
If you’re attending a writers’ conference for the first time, here are a few tips:
  • Find out how to set up meetings with agents and publishers. Do this ahead of time so you know what to expect and who you will meet. Research the publishing houses and agents who are attending to see which ones fit you/your writing project best.
  • Make sure to closely follow the guidelines they give if you want to present your book proposal in a meeting. (I highly recommend you have your proposal professionally edited before presenting it to an agent or publishing !)
  • You will also want to have copies of your maglie calcio poco prezzo one sheet, in case you meet an agent in a casual setting.
  • Perfect your elevator pitch so you can tell anyone who asks about your book.
  • Don’t judge the success or failure of the conference based on getting your book idea picked up by an agent or publisher. The more you learn about writing and publishing, the closer you get to your dream of being published. Every contact you make, piece of advice you get, and lesson you learn will help you achieve your goals.

Have you ever been to a writers’ conference? Would you recommend it? What advice would you give to someone attending for the first time?

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Get Your Book Published: Submission Sites

This week, we’ll be discussing traditional publishing. If you want to try to get your book traditionally published, you have a few options. You can get an agent, attend a writing conference where representatives from publishing houses will be, and/or include your information on a submission site like the three I’m profiling today.

 

I included the cost, requirements, how each site works, and which publishing houses use each one, based on information from  The Christian Writer’s Market Guide 2012 and the sites themselves. Before making a decision about what’s best for you, I encourage you to do more research (and pray!).

The Writer’s Edge $95-$100. You mail them a form from their site, three sample chapters, and a contents page for your book. They review your book submission, and if they believe one of their publishing houses would be cheap oakley sunglasses interested, they present them with information about your book.

Publishing houses that use The Writer’s Edge:

  • Baker Books
  • B&H Publishing Group
  • Bethany House
  • David C. Cook
  • Crossway
  • Harvest House
  • Intervarsity Press
  • Kregel
  • Moody
  • Navpress
  • New Leaf
  • Regal
  • Revell
  • Tyndale House

ChristianManuscriptSubmissions.com $98 for six months. Upload a proposal which can be viewed by publishing houses. If interested, publishers would contact you directly using the bio information you provide.

Publishing houses that use ChristianManuscriptSubmissions.com:

  • Abingdon Press
  • Baker Books
  • B&H Publishing Group
  • Bethany House
  • David C. Cook
  • Crossway
  • Harvest House
  • Intervarsity Press
  • Kregel
  • Moody
  • Navpress
  • Randall House
  • Revell
  • Tyndale House
  • Zondervan

Authonomy.com Free, a division of HarperCollins Publishers. The author posts a manuscript for the public to read and review. They track how many readers recommend particular books, and publishers can read the reviews and manuscripts if interested.

Publishing houses that use Authonomy:

  • Baker Books
  • Bethany House
  • Revell

For more information, see The Christian Writer’s Market Guide 2012.

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